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The unconscious is, so to speak, ‘outside’ rather than ‘within’ us — or rather it exists ‘between’ us, as our relationships do.”

― Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory: An Introduction

 

There is no truth that , in passing through awareness does not lie.

- The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, Jacques Lacan

 

The lack of the lack makes the real

- The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, Jacques Lacan

 

The symptom is first of all the silence in the supposed speaking subject. If he speaks, he is cured from his silence, obviously. But this does not tell us anything about why he began to speak.

- The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, Jacques Lacan

 

Now, the differential feature of the hysteric is precisely this —it is in the very movement of speaking that the hysteric constitutes her desire. So it is hardly surprising that it should be through this door that Freud entered what was, in reality, the relations of desire to language and discovered the mechanisms of the unconscious. That this relation of desire to language as such did not remain concealed from him is a feature of his genius, but this is not to say that the relation was fully elucidated—far from it—by the massive notion of the transference. The fact that, in order to cure the hysteric of all her symptoms, the best way is to satisfy her hysteric's desire—which is for her to posit her desire in relation to us as an unsatisfied desire —leaves entirely to one side the specific question of why she can sustain her desire only as an unsatisfied desire. So hysteria places us, I would say, on the track of some kind of original sin in analysis. There has to be one. The truth is perhaps simply one thing, namely, the desire of Freud himself, the fact that something, in Freud, was never analyzed. I had reached precisely this point when, by a strange coincidence, I was put into the position of having to give up my seminar. What I had to say on the Names-of-the-Father had no other purpose, in fact, than to put in question the origin, to discover by what privilege Freud's desire was able to find the entrance into the field of experience he designates as the unconscious. It is absolutely essential that we should go back to this origin if we wish to put analysis on its feet. In any case, such a mode of questioning the field of experience will be guided, in our next meeting, by the following reference—what conceptual status must we give to four of the terms introduced by Freud as fundamental concepts, namely, the unconscious, repetition, the transference and the drive?

- The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, Jacques Lacan